Several presentations at the 29th ISE Topical Meeting

We have several contributions to the 29th ISE Topical Meeting Energy and water: electrochemistry in securing the sustainable society development. On April 19th, Yuan Zhang is giving an oral presentation on “Sub-nanometer carbon confinement: pore size effect on ion permselectivity and selectivity”. On April 21st, Volker Presser is giving an oral presentation on “Beyond the double-layer: charge-transfer processes for high-performance desalination batteries”. Also, Stefanie Arnold is giving an oral poster presentation on “Antimony alloying electrode for high-performance sodium removal: how to use a battery material not stable in aqueous media for saline water remediation”.

New paper published in Chemical Engineering Journal on ion selectivity of sub-1-nm carbon pores

New paper published in Chemical Engineering Journal on the correlation of ion size / hydrated ion / pore size of sub-1-nm carbon pores. The work was done in collaboration with the team of Guang Feng (HUST, China). The work demonstrates how ion selectivity in mixed ionic systems cannot reliably be predicted by single-salt baseline testing. Also, we demonstrate the importance of durability testing since effects such as ion sieving may very well vary and change over time.

New paper published in ChemSusChem on nanoscale defect engineering and carbon nanohybridization of titanium niobium oxide

New paper published in ChemSusChem on the use of carbide-derived oxide for high performance lithium-ion battery application. The mechanochemical synthesis of the carbide is of particular interest because of potentially environmentally friendly processing route. This work was done in collaboration with Lars Borchardt (RUB).

New paper published on antimony desalination batteries in Journal of Materials Chemistry A

New paper published in Journal of Materials Chemistry A on the use of antimony for water desalination. This may sound, at first, like a contradiction when considering that Sb is not stable in water; yet, the use of a ceramic membrane and an organic electrolyte environment engulfing the antimony electrode allows the stable and high-performance removal of sodium via the antimony – sodium – alloying reaction.